Categories
Filmosophy Philosophy Thinking though Film

Plato’s Cave and the Cinema

In his Cave Allegory (Republic, c.360 BCE), Plato presents a strikingly visual account of the distinction between knowledge and belief and, in doing so, provides us with what may be considered the earliest picture-house.

Categories
Courses Filmosophy

Thinking Through Film course starts Thursday 14 January

This part-time evening course at The University of Edinburgh will begin by taking a look at Plato’s Allegory of the cave through the glazzballs of Alex in Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. There are still some places available, so if you would like to spend the next 10 weeks watching and thinking seriously about film please follow the link: https://www.course-bookings.lifelong.ed.ac.uk/courses/PH/philosophy-and-religion/PH024/thinking-through-film/

Categories
Filmosophy News

The Lobster – now showing

We’re huge fans of Greek weird-wave director Yorgos Lanthimos here at Filmosophy, and have been since the Dogtooth days. Looking forward immensely to The Lobster opening this weekend.

Categories
Filmosophy News

Filmosophy returns for a fifth season of original and thought-provoking films. This season will focus on the theme of ‘regeneration’ and is offered in association with the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine. The MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine is a world leading research centre studying stem cells, disease and tissue repair to advance human health.

  • Tuesday 8 September: Never Let Me Go (Romanek 2010)
  • Tuesday 13 October: I Am Breathing (Davie and McKinnon 2013)
  • Tuesday 10 November: The Fountain (Aronofsky 2006)
  • Tuesday 8 December: The Skin I Live In (Almodovar 2011)

The films screened will allow an opportunity to discuss the groundbreaking research currently being undertaken at the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, the diseases studied, and associated ethical issues surrounding the use of stem cells. We will seek to distinguish between science fiction and science fact, and to gain a valuable insight into the lives of those touched by the diseases and injuries that regenerative medicine aims to treat.

Click for more information and to buy tickets now

Categories
Courses Philosophy

An Introduction to Philosophy – starts Thursday 1 October @UoEShortCourses

What can we know? Does God exist? Do I have free will? How should I act? Does life have meaning? This course offers an introduction to the main areas of philosophy through discussion of some of the most interesting questions in each field.

Click here for more information or to book online.

Categories
Filmosophy News

Filmosophy: Regeneration!

’Filmosophy’ is a series of philosophical film screenings and related events curated by James Mooney of The University of Edinburgh’s Office of Lifelong Learning in association with the Edinburgh Filmhouse cinema. Previous seasons have focused on issues ranging from the appearance/ reality distinction to the doppelgänger and have featured films including Dogtooth, Moon, Pontypool, and Time Crimes.

The fifth season of Filmosophy will return in the Autumn/ Winter of 2015 and will focus on the theme of ‘regeneration’. This season will be offered in association with the Centre for Regenerative Medicine. The MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM) is a world leading research centre studying stem cells, disease and tissue repair to advance human health.

The films screened will allow an opportunity to discuss the groundbreaking research currently being undertaken at CRM, the diseases they study, and associated ethical issues surrounding the use of stem cells. We will seek to distinguish between science fiction and science fact, and to gain a valuable insight into the lives of those touched by the diseases and injuries that regenerative medicine aims to treat.

Some potential titles are: Blade Runner (Scott 1982); I Am Breathing (Davie, McKinnon 2013); Gattaca (Niccol 1997); Never Let Me Go (Romanek 2010); Rust and Bone (Audiard 2012).

Each film will be preceded by a short introduction and followed by a range of post-screening events, featuring scientists from the Centre for Regenerative Medicine and other invited speakers. The season will also incorporate artwork by Hamer Dodds, who is the artist in residence for CRM and who has been highly influential in setting up this exciting initiative.

At this point, you can get involved by suggesting relevant films which you would like to see screened and/ or themes you would like to see addressed. You can do this by commenting below or by engaging on FacebookTwitter, or Ello.

Categories
Filmosophy

3-Iron: tonight (Tue 21 Apr), 6pm at Filmhouse Edinburgh

Korean writer-director Kim Ki-duk captures raw realities about modern life while telling a genuinely touching romance using virtually no dialogue.

Tae-suk (Jae Hee) is a young man who takes up residence in homes that sit empty while the occupants are on holiday. He cleans, does the laundry, indulges in subtle practical jokes, then moves on. This pattern changes drastically when he takes up residence in the upscale home of Min-kyu and Sun-hwa, a hothead, golf-obsessed businessman and his battered trophy-wife.

http://www.filmhousecinema.com/showing/3-iron-feb15/

Categories
Access Course Access Film Studies Film

Film Narrative

In our discussion of form, we said that a film’s form included both narrative and stylistic elements. In this session we are going to focus on the narrative elements.

Humans are ‘the storytelling animal’ – it is through stories that we make sense of ourselves and the world around us. When we speak about films we, more often than not, mean narrative films – films that tell a story. Because stories are all around us (in life, literature, other films) we will approach a narrative film with a great many existing expectations. Further expectations will be aroused as we actively participate in creation of the film’s form: the ending has the task of satisfying or cheating the expectations prompted by the film as a whole. This session will consider how narrative form engages the viewer in this dynamic activity.

Categories
Access Film Studies Film

Show, don’t tell. 35 Shots of Rum (Denis 2008)

When you have a superb filmmaker (Denis), first-class actors, blocking, cinematography and a soundtrack like this, you don’t need words to tell a story.

Categories
Access Course Access Film Studies Film

Film Style and Citizen kane

In The Importance of Film Form we considered the formal elements at the filmmaker’s command, and the the overall pattern of these elements that make up the film’s formal system. This post focuses on the elements of film style – mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound – providing a few examples of how Welles’ Citizen Kane (1941) utilises these elements in and, in doing so, draws on other prominent film styles.

Categories
Access Course Access Film Studies Film

The importance of Form: introduction to film studies

Form and Content

In What is Film Studies?, I stated that films have form, and distinguished between content (the subject of a film) and form (how the content is expressed). A useful way to clarify the distinction is to consider the difference between a film in which a robbery is taking place and surveillance footage of an actual robbery. When people (shop owners, police, reality TV fans, etc.) watch surveillance footage, what they are interested in is the content – the actual robbery. Obviously the surveillance camera will have been placed in a prime position in order to see what takes place – it would be foolish, for example, to point it towards a wall or to place it at such a low angle as to only capture people’s legs – however, once these limited choices are made, the camera is, so to speak, left to its own devices. As such, when we look at the footage of a crime, what we see is a shot from a single perspective, played out in real time. The footage will have been successful if it allows us to identify the robbers, unsuccessful if it does not. While we may feel some excitement when watching such footage, this will come from the knowledge that we are watching a real crime take place, rather than from the use of any formal technique.

Categories
Filmosophy

Filmosophy – now booking

Filmosophy returns for a fourth season of original and thought-provoking films. This season focuses on the distinction between appearance and reality. Each film provides a unique perspective on this philosophical problem, using the notions of sight and blindness as powerful metaphors. Questions addressed include: What is the ultimate nature of reality? How do we gain knowledge of the world around us? What, if anything, can we know for certain? In addition, the nature of film itself – as a medium that trades in appearances and yet is intimately connected to reality – will be explored. Tue 24 February, 6.15pm: Pi (Darren Aronofsky 1998) Tue 24 March, 6.00pm: Proof (Jocelyn Moorhouse 1991) Tue 21 April, 6.00pm: 3-Iron (Kim Ki-duk 2004) Each screening will be preceded by a short introduction and followed by an opportunity to discuss the philosophical issues raised in an informal and accessible manner. The screenings will be introduced and discussion sessions hosted by James Mooney (Lecturer in Film and Philosophy and Open Studies Course Organiser at The University of Edinburgh). http://www.filmhousecinema.com/seasons/filmosophy-feb15/